The NCAA Division I Council has reportedly approved an NIT-style tournament for women’s basketball after resuming NCAA-sanctioned high school boys’ basketball summer academies on Wednesday. It will serve as a secondary postseason tournament with a target date of March 2024.

In addition, the board approved the creation of a first-of-its-kind girls high school basketball academy competition.

In order for the tournament to continue, the NCAA Board of Directors must approve expenses that coincide with the tournament. The board will meet in Indianapolis on October 25 to discuss these issues.

These types of academies, which began in the summer of 2019, are controversial in the college basketball community because NCAA coaches argue they are an unnecessary addition to the recruiting calendar. Usually, high-end prospects are not drafted.

However, the NCAA has decided that these academies are an important part of the program. So in 2023, the academies will return (after being shut down due to COVID-19), but this time there will only be one for boys, not four, and one for girls.

Another issue being discussed is the possibility of college teams playing made-for-television exhibition games during the summer months. This will include two or three unofficial games to give the players ZERO opportunities before the season starts.

“The commissioners talked about the need to have something more substantial,” the commissioner said CBS Sports. “College basketball needs to create something more meaningful this summer.”

The evidence was on display when SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey talked about how successful Kentucky’s 2022 trip to the Bahamas was on television.

NCAA executives agree with the idea, but there is a sense of urgency to approve it so it can be implemented in the summer of 2024, the source said. CBS Sports.

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/sports/report-ncaa-division-i-council-approves-womens-basketball-nit-level-tournament/3383359/

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